Building communities of compassion: Mennonite mutual aid in by Willard M. Swartley, Donald B. Kraybill, J. Winfield Fretz

By Willard M. Swartley, Donald B. Kraybill, J. Winfield Fretz

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Against the theses of Kraybill and Sweetland (1983) and Degenhardt (1965), and qualified dissent against Johnson (1977) also. 10. Rom. 12:38; 1 Cor. 1214; Eph 4:716. 11. 8. 12. Eus. Eccl. Hist. 23. 13. González: 11617; Clement Paid. 13. 14. González: 11516; Paid. 6. 15. Vis. iii. vi. 57; iii. ix. 29; Mand. 46. 16. González: 101; 2 Clem. 4. 17. Apol. 67. For a discussion of the place of this in worship, see Kreider 1997:46. 18. González: 11011; Adv. 1. 19. 78. 20. González: 129; Apol. 39. 21. González: 12526; Cypr.

Page 30 Clement reiterates the biblical warnings against wealth and love of money and finally stresses koinonia: God created our race for sharing (koinonía), beginning by giving out what belonged to God, God's own Word, making it common (koinós) to all humans, and creating all things for all (pánta poiésas ypér pántõn). Therefore all things are common (koinà oûn tà pánta); and let not the rich claim more than the rest. " is neither human nor proper to sharing (ouk anthrópinon, oude koinonikón).

The term for grace, charis, is used ten times in these two chapters. Its first use marks action and initiative from God to us in Jesus Christ. " At the other end of the appeal is the return of grace, thanksgiving to God: "Thanks (grace) be to God for his indescribable gift" (9:15). The eight uses in between point out the horizontal movement of the grace. ). (2) It proves the genuineness of one's love (8:8, 24). (3) It expresses the fruit of the Spirit (8:78). (4) It follows the example of Jesus Christ, who, "though he was rich became poor" (8:9).

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