Is This English?: Race, Language, and Culture in the by Bob Fecho

By Bob Fecho

This paintings provides a style of "critical inquiry" that enables scholars and academics to take highbrow and social hazards within the lecture room to make which means jointly and, finally, to rework literacy schooling.

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Is This English?: Race, Language, and Culture in the Classroom (Practitioner Inquiry Series, 28)

This paintings offers a mode of "critical inquiry" that permits scholars and lecturers to take highbrow and social hazards within the school room to make that means jointly and, finally, to remodel literacy schooling.

Additional resources for Is This English?: Race, Language, and Culture in the Classroom (Practitioner Inquiry Series, 28)

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This student showed strong ability to use literacy in her life, but evidence for me lay in those activities that encouraged her to make meaning of that which she read in the world. For her, the evidence lay in her ability to parrot words, although she probably would not describe it as such. At any rate, one can’t blame her because probably the most frequent and consistent way in which she was asked to demonstrate the extent of her learning and for which rewards were equally frequent and consistent were multiple-choice or short-answer assessments of this type.

So, too, did I. But even with the door closed, the rising tide of apathy that had its origins outside my classroom seemed to seep into it with greater impact each year. As I noted, too often students gave themselves little credit for learning and held few expectations for that learning. Rather than redoubling my effort, I found myself doubting my capacity to find enough good in my practice to staunch that which threatened us all. Finding my classroom becoming an island in an encroaching sea of indifference, part of me grew tired of shoring the levy, part of me kept at the task, and a growing part of me wondered whether I needed a levy at all.

4 As educator Grant Wiggins5 noted, the emphasis was on coverage—getting through all the material in the book—rather than creating deep structures of learning—having the material “get through” to the student in substantive and enduring ways. To counter this trend, I continued evolving a way to teach that would expect more of students. I remember frequently saying, almost chanting to students, that becoming a scrivener was no longer a job option, that copiers could reproduce the written page far faster and with greater fidelity than we humans could.

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