The Cheyenne: Heritage Edition (Indians of North America) by Stan Edward Hoig, Paul Rosier, Ada E. Deer

By Stan Edward Hoig, Paul Rosier, Ada E. Deer

Just like the Teton Sioux, the Cheyenne initially resided in Minnesota yet settled in North and South Dakota within the 18th century. They ultimately break up into divisions--Northern and Southern--that have been separated by way of the Arkansas River. As with many Plains Indians, the solar Dance, which referred to as for a renewal of the flora and fauna, performed an necessary position in Cheyenne society.

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The Cheyenne: Heritage Edition (Indians of North America)

Just like the Teton Sioux, the Cheyenne initially resided in Minnesota yet settled in North and South Dakota within the 18th century. They ultimately cut up into divisions--Northern and Southern--that have been separated via the Arkansas River. As with many Plains Indians, the sunlight Dance, which referred to as for a renewal of the flora and fauna, performed an crucial function in Cheyenne society.

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At the fort he was placed under the charge of John Simpson Smith, a trader married to a Cheyenne woman. With Smith, his wife and young son as his escort, Garrard took up residence in a Cheyenne camp. He spent the winter of 1846–47 in Cheyenne camps along the Arkansas and described what he saw in Wah-to-yah and the Taos Trail, a classic of the early American frontier. During his two-month stay, Garrard enjoyed the hospitality of his hosts. With them he ate meals such as buffalo jerky and dried, pounded cherries mixed with buffalo marrow.

He brought thirteen wagonloads of trinkets and goods, and initiated a new treaty that called for the Cheyennes to settle on a reservation just to the north of the Arkansas River. It was signed by chiefs Black Kettle, White Antelope, Lean Bear, Little Wolf, Tall Bear, and Left Hand. Cheyenne and Arapaho tribesmen, however, objected to being confined to an arid reservation unfit either for farming or hunting. The federal government promised them food, clothing, and other goods, but the tribes preferred their traditional way of life, which revolved around the buffalo.

Nonetheless, hostilities flared during the summer of 1863. A Cheyenne was shot and killed by a guard at Fort Larned in western Kansas, and rumors that Indians there planned a “war of extermination” against whites spread through Colorado. In response, territorial governor John Evans dispatched a frontiersman to contact the tribes and invite their chiefs to a peace council. But the chiefs, on a buffalo hunt in the Smoky Hill area of western Kansas, claimed they were needed by their people, many of whom were dying of whooping cough and dysentery.

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